The Art Of Stone Splitting

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The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby George Gunn » Wed Mar 30, 2011 12:40 pm

Pre-Industrial age rock splitting in quarries.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Pvi47a ... &q&f=false
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonewaller » Thu Mar 31, 2011 6:45 pm

Had this for a while, powwow river do some good books, a bit N.American specialised. Just got one on root cellars...
James Gage wrote an article for the last Stonechat on American chambered tombs/buildings, and haas done one for the forthcoming edition on Native American cairns. He has an amazing website ....http://www.stonestructures.org/index.html

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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby George Gunn » Thu Mar 31, 2011 8:59 pm

Nice site.
Thanks for that. Lace walls in Marthas Vineyard - must connect to the Shetlands especially since they have lots of those in Shetland.
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonewaller » Fri Apr 01, 2011 5:49 pm

If I remember there's a bit about the Martha Vineyard walls in "Sermons in Stone" by Susan Allport. Don't remember it saying anything about Shetlands. I'll add it to my check on list....There are a lot of lace walls in County Clare and on the Aran Islands..... I attach photo of one of the laciest walls of Inis Mor.
Aran Lacewall red.jpg
Aran Lacewall red.jpg (118.63 KiB) Viewed 10189 times


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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby waller 69 » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:01 pm

I except i am but an infant, 30 years is just a spit in an ocean, how does it work????? i will always have more questions than answers, but i do love this site :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonewaller » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:08 pm

how does it work?????

It..... Lacewalls or stone splitting?


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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonedyker@talk21.com » Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:58 pm

Lace walls are also known as 'singing walls' because when the wind blows through them they can make musical notes. Some folks still believe the native Americans built the walls with holes in them to produce music.
Sean - there are some very low lace walls near Clachtoll on the west coast.
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonewaller » Sat Apr 02, 2011 3:59 pm

Feeling marginally silly as I now see the website refers to Allports book. Marthas vineyard is actually half a chapter the second half of the chapter deals with Shaker walls around Canterbury. More embarassingly there's a review of the book by me on my websitehttp://www.dry-stone.co.uk/Pages/Books/Sermons.html.

Where can I get my memory serviced?

Anyway she looks at why these walls occur, discusses a Scottish connection. All the usual pat stuff. No real conclusions.
Nick
Sean - there are some very low lace walls near Clachtoll on the west coast.

George
must connect to the Shetlands especially since they have lots of those in Shetland

How common are these walls and do you have photos, are they vertical angled or flat laid. The argument that lace walls because they are single are likely ot have a Scottish influence always bugs me a little. Most Scottish singles I've come across are not very lacey and are essentially not flat laid. English and Welsh singles (just completed 100m of one another 20 or 30 m of stone balancing to go) although somewhat sporadic are almost inevitably flat laid, and gappier. More like the pictures I've seen of Martha's vineyard.

One of Allports most quotable bits is in the Marthas vineyard section (as are the whisky walls mentioned in my review)
...historical records - like lacewalls themselves- are full of holes and the largest ones seem to be where records of agriculture and farm practices should go
ByNSingleRed.jpg
North Welsh ones often get wider as they go up, often are not very holey
ByNSingleRed.jpg (122.38 KiB) Viewed 10164 times


BynHoleyRed.jpg
Here's a holey one. Most Welsh singles tend to have a doubled component
BynHoleyRed.jpg (85.98 KiB) Viewed 10164 times
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby George Gunn » Mon Apr 04, 2011 3:23 pm

"...historical records - like lacewalls themselves- are full of holes and the largest ones seem to be where records of agriculture and farm practices should go "

That's a good one ! :lol:
Sorry Sean no pics but in Shetland they are flat laid, you can see some on the right hand side of the road going North from Sumburgh airport. I had a look when I was working for Alan smiles on the "Shetland Bus " memorial carpark about 14 years ago. Maybe he has photos ?
There are some good examples of very gappy single walls near Kinlochbervie in Sutherland.
One of the best and highest at about eight feet, but looking higher as it runs across a steep slope is behind the Minisupermarket at Kinlochbervie harbour,it's been well protected from the Northerlies by a crag. Might have a pic of that , actually...but where it is, is something else !
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby stonedyker@talk21.com » Tue Apr 05, 2011 3:53 pm

Sean,
the Clachtoll walls are very like the Aran walls you showed on a previous posting. They are long stones laid horizontally across upright stones, really only the roughest of fences. They may have worked for cattle, unlikely to show sheep back. My pics are all on another hard drive but I may have sent you pics of these wall a few months back.
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Re: The Art Of Stone Splitting

Postby magic25 » Tue Apr 19, 2011 10:15 am

I am a passerby yet my eyes are glued on these creations. I wish I will win the lottery tomorrow and be able to afford the cost of making one like this in our humble abode.
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